QR & Microsoft Tag Codes

QR & Microsoft Tag Codes

What are QR and Microsoft Tag Codes? A QR Code¬†is basically a barcode but with the ability to store so much more data. They’re used for encoding information in two-dimensional space – like on packaging and labels, shop displays, printed and billboard displays, pages of magazines or papers, in advertisements, even on TV and Web sites. They were first developed to track auto parts, but have become increasingly popular (especially in Japan) for much broader and wider commercial purposes. How are they different to a barcode? Barcodes encode data in only the horizontal plane as scanners read the width and distance between the vertical lines, QR codes encode data both vertically and horizontally in a grid of small squares. This enables more data to be encoded into smaller spaces. Barcodes, then, though seemingly everywhere, are good for not much more than identifying products and objects. Special scanners can read barcodes, match them to names of products, prices and inventory, but that’s about their limit. QR codes, however, can actually embed that information in the code itself and when read with the relevant software, can launch a website or download a file. ¬†Additionally, QR codes are able to be read from any angle, while barcodes must be aligned correctly. So what exactly can I do with QR and Microsoft Tag Codes? QR codes are tailor-made for quick and easy linking to content on smartphones. More simple uses include magazine ads that link to company websites. Putting the codes to more complex use, android uses QR codes to directly link to apps in the android marketplace and the municipality of Bordeaux...